Monthly Archives: June 2021

Boeing appoints new Chief Financial Officer Aviation Feature, Aviation News

Boeing appoints new Chief Financial Officer 1

West will lead all aspects of Boeing’s financial strategy, performance, reporting and long-range business planning, as well as investor relations, treasury, controller, and audit operations.West will report to Boeing President and CEO David Calhoun and will serve on the company’s Executive Council.West succeeds Greg Smith, who previously announced his plans to retire, effective in early July.

The Boeing Company today named Brian West as the company’s executive vice president and chief financial officer effective August 27, 2021.
In this role, West will lead all aspects of Boeing’s financial strategy, performance, reporting and long-range business planning, as well as investor relations, treasury, controller, and audit operations. West will also oversee the company’s business transformation efforts and will have executive responsibility for the company’s global financing arm, Boeing Capital Corporation. He will report to Boeing President and CEO David Calhoun and will serve on the company’s Executive Council.

“Brian is the ideal executive to serve as Boeing’s next CFO given his significant financial management and long-term strategic planning experience in complex global organizations across the aerospace, manufacturing and services industries,” said Calhoun. “I have had the pleasure of working with Brian previously, and he is an exceptional leader whose broad operational expertise and commitment to transparency with stakeholders will advance our efforts as we continue our focus on safety and quality, improving our performance and transforming our company for the future.”
West joins Boeing following a successful and diverse career in senior financial and operational roles spanning several industries, including aerospace, manufacturing, infrastructure, healthcare, global information services, financial and risk management. He has served as the chief financial officer of Refinitiv since 2018, and was previously CFO and executive vice president of Operations for Oscar Health Insurance and CFO and COO of Nielsen. Prior to Nielsen, West spent 16 years at General Electric, where he served as CFO of GE Aviation and CFO of GE Engine Services. His additional finance leadership positions in GE businesses encompassed plastics, transportation and energy.
West is a founding board member of a Connecticut-based nonprofit organization whose mission is to prepare the next generation of diverse female leaders with the skills, community and connections to thrive in the world. He previously was a board member of Future 5, an organization that helps under-resourced students in Stamford, CT reach their full potential.

West holds a bachelor’s degree in Finance from Siena College and a Master’s in Business Administration from the Columbia Business School.
West succeeds Greg Smith, who previously announced his plans to retire, effective in early July. The company has named Dave Dohnalek, currently Boeing’s senior vice president and Treasurer, to the role of interim CFO until West joins the company in late August.
“I want to thank Greg again for his outstanding contributions to our employees, customers, communities and our company throughout his more than thirty years of service with Boeing,” said Calhoun. “I also want to thank Dave for assuming interim leadership of our Finance organization. With decades of executive leadership experience at Boeing across treasury, investor relations, financial planning and more, Dave is a highly respected and effective leader who will bring informed and balanced guidance to our Finance organization during this transition period.”

Train + Air: Air France reaffirms commitment to environmental sustainability Aviation Feature, Aviation News

Train + Air: Air France reaffirms commitment to environmental sustainability 2

Air France expands its ‘Train + Air’ program.Air France’s expansion highlights the serious steps the carrier is taking to reduce its carbon emissions.Air France has committed to reducing its domestic flight emissions by 50% by 2025 from 2019 levels.

The recent expansion of Air France’s ‘Train + Air’ program highlights its strong commitment to environmental sustainability. As passengers increasingly demand more environmentally friendly travel options, the airline is protecting its future revenues by establishing meaningful solutions.
Although it is not a new scheme, Air France’s expansion highlights the serious steps the carrier is taking to reduce its carbon emissions. Air France has committed to reducing its domestic flight emissions by 50% by 2025 from 2019 levels and these steps are vital to achieving this. Seven additional routes were added and 18 are now bookable. Offering a single ticket, loyalty points, and connection protection, the airline has made an environmentally friendly program extremely attractive to passengers, while creating an intermodal transport operation fit for the future.

Travelers are increasingly likely to be influenced by how environmentally friendly a product or service is. Industry’s Q1 2021 Consumer Survey revealed that 76% of global respondents are ‘always’, ‘often’, or ‘sometimes’ influenced by this factor, rising to 78% amongst French respondents.
Air France has recognized the increased possibility that passengers will switch to more environmentally friendly travel options on short-haul routes, especially rail, given that the flight shaming movement has gained momentum across Europe. This industry-leading strategy will pay dividends in protecting the carrier’s brand image for years to come, while reducing its flying activity.
Many of the carrier’s long-haul routes rely on domestic feeds from regional airports, and this scheme ensures it does not lose these much-needed passengers. By acting proactively in the theme of sustainability, the carrier will establish a strong presence in this trend before its competitors and could become the intermodal transport operator of choice within France.

Rail travel was the second most popular transport choice, behind road, for domestic trips within France in 2019 utilized for 17.4% (29.3 million) of trips. It is forecasted that by 2025 rail will account for 18% of domestic trips, totaling 31.4 million trips.
Rail travel has gained popularity recently, and with an extensive high-speed network across France, it is set to become more popular. With the short-haul market likely to take the biggest hit in the years to come, especially with the French Government mulling bans on certain domestic routes, this smart strategy will ensure Air France is viewed as an intermodal transportation leader. The expansion to Air France’s ‘Air + Rail’ program further reinforces the serious steps the airline is taking to become more environmentally friendly, while allowing the company to be seen as a progressive entity that genuinely cares about sustainability.

Air Canada bans emotional support animals Aviation Feature, Aviation News

Air Canada bans emotional support animals 3

Emotional support animals no longer allowed on Air Canada flights.Mental health professionals slam Air Canada’s ESA ban.The airlines are saying that if you have a physical or medical disability you can have an assistance animal, but if you have a mental disability, you can’t.

This week, Air Canada made the decision to ban emotional support animals from their flight cabins. This comes on the heels of the US’ Department of Transportation ruling that ESA’s are not considered service animals and therefore US-based airlines are not required to accept them onboard. 
Currently, “Air Canada‘s new rules are consistent with the Accessible Transportation for Persons with Disabilities Regulations under the Canada Transportation Act, which apply to airlines and other transportation bodies.”

However, Ontario human rights and accessibility law (which does not apply to airlines in Canada) recognizes a wider range of animals as “service animals.” 
Case law from the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario recognizes that “service animals” include animals who are not trained or certified by a recognized disability‑related organization and who assist people with mental disabilities (see Allarie v. Rouble, 2010 HRTO 61 (CanLII)).
Mental health professional and the world’s leading animal-assisted therapist Prairie Conlon, LPC, NCC & Clinical Director at CertaPet, slams the airline ESA ban:

“We know that service animals and emotional support animals are very different and they serve different purposes. But how can they say that someone with a physical disability, or certain mental disabilities like PTSD can have a service dog when they have a legitimate need for them, but someone who has been diagnosed by a clinician with a mental health disorder and has a legitimate need for them can’t have their animal with them anymore? That is textbook discrimination. To put it more simply, the airlines are saying that if you have a physical or medical disability you can have an assistance animal, but if you have a mental disability, you can’t.” 

Ryanair gains competitive advantage with Boeing 737 MAX Aviation Feature, Aviation News

Ryanair gains competitive advantage with Boeing 737 MAX 4

Boeing 737 MAX will give Ryanair a strong competitive advantage over the next five years.Boeing 737 MAX will enhance Ryanair’s sustainable proposition by reducing fuel consumption by 16% per seat.Boeing 737 MAX will enable an additional 4% passenger capacity.

Ryanair finally announced its first arrival of the Boeing 737 MAX jet, which is described by the low-cost carrier as a ‘game-changer’. Despite the grounding of the aircraft in 2019 over safety concerns, Ryanair negotiated purchases of 210 units, with a maximum of 12 operating for the 2021 summer season. The aircraft will enhance Ryanair’s sustainable proposition by reducing fuel consumption by 16% per seat, reducing noise emissions by 40%, and enabling an additional 4% passenger capacity – all of which will give Ryanair a strong competitive advantage over the next five years.
The sustainability benefits of the aircraft will meet changing consumer preferences for more environmentally friendly products. According to industry’s Q1 2021 Consumer survey, 76% of respondents said they were ‘always’, ‘often’, or ‘somewhat’ influenced by the environmental friendliness of a product, highlighting the appetite for more sustainable aircraft. As a result, Ryanair finds itself in a unique position by meeting modern-day consumer trends and its traditional core market by offering low-cost fares. A recent industry poll further supported this sentiment towards low-cost fares, with 53% of respondents saying cost was the most crucial factor when selecting an airline.

Ryanair has understood and built on its brand by not only offering low fares, but offering a greener and potentially even lower-cost service to its customers. As a result, the product will not only attract environmentally conscious travelers, but continue to meet its core mass-market regarding low-cost fares.
Safety concerns remain following the tragic Lion Air crash in October 2018 and Ethiopian Airlines crash in March 2019. These incidents have caused some airlines to cancel orders and seek compensation. Ryanair, however, remains committed to Boeing 737 MAX and, according to the CEO Michael O’Leary, the company has secured a ‘very modest’ price discount on the order. 
The aircraft was also heavily scrutinized by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) during the two years it was grounded and the decision to let it take to the skies again has not been taken lightly.

Ultimately, the lower operating costs of the aircraft fit perfectly into Ryanair’s business model. Most airlines cannot purchase new aircraft or commit to leases due to the pandemic, leaving them with an older, less economic fleet. As Ryanair tackles the post-pandemic travel rush in 2022 with low, but more profitable fares, it will have gained a clear competitive advantage over many other airlines.

Air Canada announces election of directors Aviation Feature, Aviation News

Air Canada announces election of directors 5

Air Canada’s Annual Meeting of Shareholders was held on Tuesday, June 29, 2021.All of the nominees listed in its management proxy circular were elected as directors of Air Canada.Final voting results on all matters voted on at the meeting will be filed on SEDAR.

Air Canada announced today that all of the nominees listed in its management proxy circular dated May 6, 2021 were elected as directors of Air Canada at its Annual Meeting of Shareholders which was held on Tuesday, June 29, 2021.
All of the nominees have already been serving as directors of Air Canada and each of the directors was elected by a majority of the votes cast by shareholders present online or represented by proxy at the meeting. The results of the vote are detailed below.

NomineeVotes For% ForVotes Withheld% WithheldAmee Chande139,562,87095.45%6,656,3054.55%Christie J.B. Clark139,159,06095.17%7,060,1154.83%Gary A. Doer138,644,84094.82%7,574,3355.18%Rob Fyfe138,923,88195.01%7,295,2944.99%Michael M. Green131,072,64989.64%15,146,52610.36%Jean Marc Huot137,430,29693.99%8,788,8796.01%Madeleine Paquin145,829,34799.73%389,8280.27%Michael Rousseau145,771,42199.69%447,7540.31%Vagn Sørensen131,891,67390.20%14,327,5029.80%Kathleen Taylor138,914,12495.00%7,305,0515.00%Annette Verschuren145,896,09399.78%323,0820.22%Michael M. Wilson138,032,88694.40%8,186,2895.60%
Final voting results on all matters voted on at the meeting will be filed on SEDAR.

Direct flights from Munich to Dubai on Lufthansa now Aviation Feature, Aviation News

Direct flights from Munich to Dubai on Lufthansa now 6

Lufthansa announces new UAE route.From October 1, 2021, Lufthansa flies nonstop from Munich to Dubai.Three weekly flights with the Airbus A350-900.  

If you want to extend your summer, now is the best opportunity to do so. Just in time for the winter half-year and coinciding with the opening of the EXPO, Lufthansa is taking off from Munich directly to Dubai.
From October 1 to April 23 – the end of the Bavarian Easter holidays – an Airbus A350-900 will fly three times a week to the Persian Gulf.

LH 638 starts with ideal flight times: Departure from Munich is at 10:30 p.m., arrival in Dubai at 6:40 a.m. the following day. The return flight departs at 8:30 a.m. and arrives in Munich at 12:50 p.m.
“We are pleased to be able to offer an attractive long-haul destination as a new route from Munich for the first time since the pandemic began. Due to the high demand, Munich is the third hub of the Lufthansa Group to add Dubai to its flight schedule, after Frankfurt and Zurich. And for the first time, our passengers will be able to travel from Munich to the Emirates on the most sustainable long-haul aircraft in our fleet: the Airbus A350-900,” says Stefan Kreuzpaintner, Head of the Munich hub and Head of Sales for the Lufthansa Group.
Lufthansa already flew from Munich to Dubai from 2003 to 2016, most recently with an Airbus A330.

The health and safety of passengers is a top priority for Lufthansa. The services offered on board and the procedures before and during the flight have therefore been adapted to the current regulatory requirements. Among other things, this applies to the distance rules for boarding and disembarking and the obligation to wear a medical mask. Hepa filters also clean the cabin air, comparable to an operating room.

Southwest Airlines announces new Executive Vice President, other leadership changes Aviation Feature, Aviation News

Southwest Airlines announces new Executive Vice President, other leadership changes 7

Managing Director Tony Roach is promoted to Vice President Customer Experience & Customer Relations.Anthony Gregory, former Vice President Ground Operations, is leaving Southwest Airlines.Chris Johnson will immediately assume responsibility for all of Ground Operations and Provisioning.

Southwest Airlines Co. today announced the promotion of Senior Vice President and Chief Communications Officer Linda Rutherford to Executive Vice President People & Communications, effective immediately. This news follows last week’s announcement of Leadership Plans for 2022. Rutherford will succeed Bob Jordan in what was the Executive Vice President Corporate Services role, as he pivots to making the CEO transition as smooth as possible and spending time with Employees across the Company.
Rutherford will report directly to Jordan and will continue to serve as the Chief Communications Officer for the Company. She will continue to oversee Communications & Outreach and Culture & Engagement, while adding Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion (DE&I), People, and Southwest Airlines University to her responsibilities. Reporting to Rutherford in her new role will be Vice President and Chief People Officer Julie Weber, Managing Director Communications & Outreach Laurie Barnett, Managing Director Culture & Engagement Whitney Eichinger, Vice President Southwest Airlines University Elizabeth Bryant, and Director DE&I Raquel Daniels.

Rutherford is approaching 30 years at Southwest Airlines after joining the Company in 1992. In recent years, she has helped build enterprise change agility, continued the strategic implementation of programming and incentives aimed at nurturing our Corporate Culture, led Enterprise efforts to develop and implement an Employee Experience roadmap, championed the enterprise social business strategy, devised relevant programming for Employee engagement, and evolved multi-channel communications support system for multiple stakeholders internally and externally. She guided the Company’s response effort at the Enterprise level to the COVID-19 pandemic and the death of the Company’s beloved Founder Herb Kelleher.
“Linda is an innovative Leader who challenges Southwest to continually evolve how we engage and champion our Employees and Communities, and she consistently delivers on our Southwest Purpose, to connect People to what’s important in their lives with friendly, reliable and low-cost air travel,” said Bob Jordan, EVP and incoming CEO. 
The carrier also announced Leadership changes in Operational and Commercial Departments.

Allegiant announces 23 new nonstop routes Aviation Feature, Aviation News

Allegiant announces 23 new nonstop routes 8

Allegiant continues to expand its flight network.Allegiant to launch new routes for fall vacation and holiday travel to destinations across the country.Four new cities among the offerings, including Melbourne, Fla.; Amarillo, Texas; Washington, D.C. and Minneapolis.

Allegiant today announces 23 new nonstop routes for fall vacation and holiday travel to destinations across the country, including 10 routes to four new cities: Melbourne, Fla.; Amarillo, Texas; Washington, D.C. and Minneapolis. 
“We continue to expand our network to provide customers with our unique brand of convenient, affordable nonstop service to even more of the cities they want to visit – whether it’s for a long overdue vacation, or to reconnect with family and friends,” said Drew Wells, Allegiant‘s senior vice president of revenue and planning.

“Now more than ever, travelers choose to fly Allegiant because we take them directly to their destinations – without the hassle of layovers or connections.”
The new routes to Austin, Texas via Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (AUS) include:
Amarillo, Texas via Rick Husband Amarillo International Airport (AMA) – beginning Nov. 18, 2021Louisville, Kentucky via Louisville International Airport (SDF) – beginning Nov. 18, 2021Orange County, California via John Wayne Airport (SNA) – beginning Nov. 18, 2021Provo, Utah via Provo Airport (PVU) – beginning Nov. 18, 2021Sioux Falls, South Dakota via Sioux Falls Regional Airport (FSD) – beginning Nov. 18, 2021Springfield, Missouri via Springfield-Branson National Airport (SGF) – beginning Nov. 18, 2021Tulsa, Oklahoma via Tulsa International Airport (TUL) – beginning Nov. 18, 2021
The new nonstop routes to Amarillo, Texas via Rick Husband Amarillo International Airport (AMA) include:

Las Vegas, Nevada via McCarran International Airport (LAS) – beginning Oct. 14, 2021Austin, Texas via Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (AUS) – beginning Nov. 18, 2021
The new nonstop routes to Washington, D.C. via Dulles International Airport (IAD) include:
Jacksonville, Florida via Jacksonville International Airport (JAX) – beginning Nov. 19, 2021Sarasota, Florida via Sarasota Bradenton International Airport (SRQ) –  beginning Dec. 18, 2021
The new nonstop routes to Melbourne, Fla. via Melbourne Orlando International Airport (MLB) include:
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania via Pittsburgh International Airport (PIT) – beginning Nov. 11, 2021Nashville, Tennessee via Nashville International Airport (BNA) – beginning Nov. 18, 2021Concord, North Carolina via Concord-Padgett Airport (USA) – beginning Nov. 18, 2021
The new nonstop routes to Minneapolis, Minn. via Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport (MSP) include:

Asheville, North Carolina via Asheville Regional Airport (AVL) – beginning Oct. 7, 2021Punta Gorda, Florida via Punta Gorda Airport (PGD) – beginning Oct. 8, 2021Palm Beach, Florida via Palm Beach International Airport (PBI) – beginning Oct. 7, 2021
The new nonstop routes to Punta Gorda, Fla. via Punta Gorda Airport (PGD) include:
Minneapolis, Minnesota via Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport (MSP) – beginning Oct. 8, 2021Springfield, Missouri via Springfield-Branson National Airport (SGF) – beginning Nov. 19, 2021
The new nonstop routes to Orange County, Calif. via John Wayne Airport (SNA) include:
Eugene, Oregon via Eugene Airport (EUG) – beginning Oct. 8, 2021Austin, Texas via Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (AUS) – beginning Nov. 18, 2021
The new routes to Nashville, Tenn. via Nashville International Airport (BNA) include:
Palm Springs, California via Palm Springs International Airport (PSP) – beginning Nov. 17, 2021Melbourne, Florida via Melbourne Orlando International Airport (MLB) – beginning Nov. 18, 2021Jacksonville, Florida via Jacksonville International Airport (JAX) – beginning Nov. 18, 2021
The new nonstop routes to Jacksonville, Fla. via Jacksonville International Airport (JAX) include:
Nashville, Tennessee via Nashville International Airport (BNA) – beginning Nov. 18, 2021Dulles, Virginia via Dulles International Airport (IAD) – beginning Nov. 19, 2021
The new nonstop route to Las Vegas via McCarran International Airport (LAS) from Amarillo, Texas via Rick Husband Amarillo International Airport (AMA) begins Oct. 14, 2021
The new nonstop route from Houston, Texas via William P. Lobby Airport to Bentonville, Ark. via Bentonville Municipal Airport (XNA) begins Nov.19, 2021
The new nonstop route from Des Moines, Iowa via Des Moines International Airport (DSM) to Fort Lauderdale, Fla. via Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport (FLL) begins Oct. 6, 2021
The new nonstop route from Wichita, Kansas via Wichita Dwight D. Eisenhower National Airport (ICT) to St. Petersburg, Fla. via St. Pete-Clearwater International Airport (PIE) begins Nov. 19, 2021

Middle East executives: Leading an airline in 2021 Aviation Feature, Aviation News

Middle East executives: Leading an airline in 2021 9

Middle East aviation standards are bringing new levels of comfort, services, and onboard amenities to travelers.The aviation industry around the globe has been hit hard by COVID-19 and all its ramifications.Over the first 5 months of 2021, capacity levels were down by around half compared to pre-pandemic levels.

IATA traffic data for March 2021 showed capacity has been down 80 percent compared to March 2019. The recovery is happening, and more of the world is beginning to open up, but the road ahead remains a challenge.
In a recent CAPA – Centre for Aviation live event, Richard Maslen, European Content Editor for CAPA, said: “It cannot be denied the lead in any part of an airline in 2021, 2022, and even onwards, is going to look very different than ever before.”

Read on – or listen to – this informative and timely conversation with Middle East aviation heavy hitters Arab Air Carriers Organization (AACO) Secretary General Abdul Wahab Teffaha, Qatar Airways Chief Transformation Officer Thiery Antinori, and Gulf Air Acting CEO Waleed Al Alawi.
Richard Maslen:
The impact of COVID-19 has required all airlines to reassess their processes, innovate and adapt to a new world order. Our regular critical thinking panel has this month come to the middle east and we’re delighted to be joined by Mr. Abdul Wahab Teffaha, Secretary General of Arab Air Carriers Organization, Mr. Thiery Antinori, chief commercial officer at Qatar airways, and Mr. Waleed Al Alawi, acting CEO of Gulf Air. So I think it’s quite important to begin with, to actually get an understanding of the local area and how it has been hit by COVID over the last 18 months. So Mr Abdul Wahab Teffaha, can you just give us a brief introduction as to how the middle east and the Arab airlines have been hit by COVID and what the situation is right now?

Turkey bans direct flights from Bangladesh, Brazil, South Africa, India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka Aviation Feature, Aviation News

Turkey bans direct flights from Bangladesh, Brazil, South Africa, India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka 10

Some countries showed a recent escalation due to the new variants of the COVID-19 virus.Turkey decided to shut down its borders for any direct entries including through land, air, sea or railway from six countries.Travelers arriving to Turkey from another country after having been in one of those countries will be required to provide a negative COVID-19 test result conducted in the last 72 hours.

Turkish authorities announced that Turkey is suspending direct flights from six countries over the spike of the new variants of the COVID-19 virus cases in those states.
Turkey’s Interior Ministry issued a circular stating that the country suspended flights from Bangladesh, Brazil, South Africa, India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka as of July 1 and until further notice.

The ministry noted that the course of the pandemic in some countries showed a recent escalation due to the new variants of the COVID-19 virus.
Following the Health Ministry’s recommendations, Turkey decided to shut down its borders for any direct entries including through land, air, sea or railway from these countries.
Travelers arriving to Turkey from another country after having been in one of those countries in the last 14 days will be required to provide a negative COVID-19 test result conducted in the last 72 hours.

They will also be quarantined at places determined by local governorates for 14 days, at the end of which a negative test will be required one more time.
In case of a positive test result, the patient will be kept under isolation, which will end with a negative result in the following 14 days.
The ministry’s circular added that passengers arriving at Turkey from the UK, Iran, Egypt, and Singapore would be required to have a negative COVID-19 test result obtained in the last three days.

For travelers arriving to Turkey from countries other than Bangladesh, Brazil, South Africa, India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Afghanistan, Pakistan, the UK, Iran, Egypt and Singapore, those who can provide a document showing the administering of a COVID-19 vaccine in the last 14 days or recovery from COVID-19 infection in the last six months will not be required to present a test result or be quarantined.
A negative COVID-19 test result conducted in the last 72 hours before arriving at Turkey or a negative rapid antigen test conducted within maximum 48 hours after their arrival will suffice for those failing to provide the documents.

Budapest Airport: Ninth Runway Run is on! Aviation Feature, Aviation News

Budapest Airport: Ninth Runway Run is on! 11

By adapting race conditions, and meeting safety and security regulations, the airport will once again host the unique run.This year’s air transport industry charity-sportive event will take place on Saturday 18 September 2021 on Budapest Airport’s 13R-31L runway.Proceeds from this year’s run will be shared between Hungarian disability group SUHANJ! Foundation and international blood cancer charity, Anthony Nolan.

Following recognition as Anthony Nolan’s Organizational Fundraiser of the Year, Budapest Airport and anna.aero have confirmed this year’s air transport industry charity-sportive event will take place on Saturday 18 September 2021 on Budapest Airport’s 13R-31L runway.
Having raised a cumulative €220,000 for charity since 2013, the proceeds of this year’s run will be shared between Hungarian disability group SUHANJ! Foundation and international blood cancer charity, Anthony Nolan. With all entry fees donated to the chosen charities, runners from airlines, airports and enterprises across the aviation community are invited to join teams from various prestigious companies and athletes from the SUHANJ! Foundation, in the race which will comprise of two running distances – 10km (four runway lengths) and 5km.

Chris Dinsdale, CEO, Budapest Airport comments: “In addition to running together in a unique environment, on an airport runway, participants will also support several good causes. We at Budapest Airport believe that social responsibility is important, so it is a great pleasure for us to join forces for the aims represented by the SUHANJ! Foundation and Anthony Nolan, for the ninth year in a row.”
Despite the difficulties the pandemic has raised for all in the aviation community and societies worldwide, Budapest Airport’s key priority is to continue to support noble causes, even more so during testing times. By adapting race conditions, and meeting safety and security regulations, the airport will once again host the unique run as the only major, and totally-connected, European airport able to commit to the closure of a runway in daylight hours on a Saturday.
“In the face of immense struggles for all, Budapest Airport maintained this great tradition last year and raised almost €20,000 thanks to the participation of nearly 600 runners. We see it as a crucial role to continue our fundraising and look forward to welcoming all our loyal supporters, as well as new runners, to our annual run this year,” adds Dinsdale.

Budapest Airport will also be holding a competition to allow another lucky 100 runners to take part in the race through a prize draw which will be announced on the airport’s social media at a later date.

US travel industry should address trust gaps in price transparency, COVID-19 safety Aviation Feature, Aviation News

US travel industry should address trust gaps in price transparency, COVID-19 safety 12

The majority of US travelers that participated in the study said the travel industry has done well in implementing COVID-19 health and safety measures.35% of US travelers reported that they currently trust travel companies to use their personal information in the right way.The research also uncovered evidence that trust directly influences purchasing behavior.

According to new independent research, the travel industry can boost global recovery by addressing consumer trust gaps in price transparency, COVID-19 health and safety measures, data privacy and information credibility.
The Four Trust Gaps

Price Transparency
The study of 11,000 travelers across 10 countries, including 1,000 in the United States, was conducted by Edelman Data & Intelligence (DxI), the research and analytics arm of Edelman, which has studied trust for over 20 years through the Edelman Trust Barometer. In the US, it revealed the two most important factors in building consumer trust in travel agencies and travel suppliers, such as airlines, are having ‘no hidden costs’ (64%) and ‘fully flexible or refundable products’ (55%). Unfortunately, most travelers currently deem industry performance in both of these areas to be poor (67% and 61% respectively). US travelers were among the world’s most disappointed, with a significant 31 and 16 percentage point gap between importance and performance on those two points respectively.
2. COVID-19 Health & Safety
The majority (52%) of US travelers that participated in the study said the travel industry has done well in implementing COVID-19 health and safety measures. Going forward, however, around half said they would like more reassurance on how robustly some measures are being enforced, in particular, improved air filtration, social distancing and managed boarding and queuing.

3. Data Privacy
Data privacy was another key issue highlighted by the research. Less than four in 10 of US travelers  (35%, compared to 40% globally) reported that they currently trust travel companies to use their personal information in the right way. Globally, this was especially apparent among Baby Boomers (33%) and Gen Z (36%) respondents.
When it comes to using information to personalize experiences, travelers in the US said they are most comfortable with companies using data that they have actively shared with them through one-to-one conversations (46%), past booking behavior (44%) and loyalty activity (44%). They are less comfortable, however, when information is sourced indirectly, for example, through social media activity (26%), public records like credit scores (31%) and past shopping, search and booking behavior with other companies (35%).

4. Information Credibility
According to the research, the most trusted source of travel-related information that travelers in the US use when researching a trip are those perceived to have aligned interests: friends and family (73%), with the next-most trusted source of review websites coming in far behind (46%). In contrast, the least trusted are those with a clear vested interest in selling, such as social media influencers (23%) and celebrities (19%). Once again, Gen Z was revealed to be the least trusting in almost every category globally.
A similar story played out when examining trust in different types of travel-related information. Customer ratings (52%) and written customer reviews (46%) are among the most trusted amongst travelers in the US. However, third-party certification (34%), photos of products such as hotel rooms provided by travel companies (37%), and third-party ratings such as hotel star systems (39%) were revealed to be the least trusted. 
Enabling Retail
In addition to identifying gaps in trust, the research also uncovered evidence that trust directly influences purchasing behavior. Due to COVID-19, nearly half (49%) of US travelers today, for example, were shown to prioritize trust over all other factors when choosing a travel supplier. Many travelers also stated, when trust is in place, they will consider purchasing multiple travel-related items (50%), upgrading their package (40%) and buying non-travel-related items such as credit cards (29%).